Article | Category: Glossary Terms

Healing energy believed to be generated by quartz and other minerals. Crystals are known to have electromagnetic energy, as does the human body. When a natural quartz crystal is brought into contact with a person's etheric body, the electromagnetic attraction is capable of drawing imbalanced energy out of the human body.

 

BACKGROUND

 

Other Names:

Crystal Therapy

 

Description of Offering

By placing crystals on or around the body, they will release positive energy into the body while absorbing and taking out the negative.

 

This offering has its roots in ancient practices.

 

Origin of Offering

Ancient Egypt (4-5000+ years ago),

 

Creator of Offering (Nationality)

Ancient Sumerians

 

Brief History of the Offering

The first historical references come from the Ancient Sumerians who used crystals for health and protection. Later in history, stones were also found being used in Greece and China for safety and good fortune.

 

Fun Fact

Greek soldiers would rub hematite, an iron ore, over their bodies before battle, to make themselves invulnerable.

 

BENEFITS

 

Primary Benefit Received:

Energy Alignment

 

Other Benefits

Heal or prevent illness.

 

Comment about Research Selection

There is no current research on the benefits of crystal healing.

 

DETAILS

 

Typical Length of Offering

45 - 60 minutes

 

The offering is most often provided one guest at a time.

 

Offering is primarily suited for:

Day Spa (wellness focus), Destination Spa, Medical Clinic/Spa,

 

How many treatment providers are needed to produce the offering?

One.

 

Common License/Certification or Training necessary to provide the offering:

No license/certification/training necessary. Optional crystal healing certification available.

 

Comments about Offering Protocol

When receiving Crystal Healing Therapy, you will be asked what aspect of your life or health condition you want to improve and the healer will have you lie down and will place the crystals in the appropriate places around the body. Some place the crystals on the seven chakras of the body.

 

Type of space/facility most often used for the offering:

One-on-One Consultation Area

 

Type of space/facility that can be use for the offering:

Private Dry Treatment Room

 

How many towels are used?

N/A

 

Does the guest generally use a robe and/or a wrap for the offering?

No.

 

How many sheets are used?

N/A

 

Does the offering require the use of products (i.e. lotions, lacquers, scrubs, cleansers, etc.)?

Yes.

 

How many different products are used?

2

 

Approximate product cost per treatment:

$2 USD

 

Products used:

Optional aromatherapy essential oils and lotion/oils.

 

Does the offering require the use of disposable supplies (i.e. cotton squares, balls and swabs, lancets, etc.)?

No.

 

Equipment and supplies needed to provide the offering:

Raised massage-style table, crystals,

 

Beyond labor, linens, disposable supplies and products, please list any other direct costs associated with the offering?

N/A

 

Including only the following items (products, disposable items, linen laundry, and other direct costs---not labor), what is the typical cost of the offering?

$2 - $5 USD

 

Comments about offering costs.

If lotions/oils are added, there are associated costs.

 

Typical single session price of the offering.

$50 - $100 USD

 

SOURCES

 

Publication used to prepare this submission.

A Brief History of Crystals and Healing

Janelle Scialla

Historical References (2017)

www.crystalage.com

 

Crystal Healing

Elizabeth Palermo

Stone-Cold Facts About Gemstone Treatments  (2015)

www.livescience.com

 

Vibrational Energy Healing With Crystals

How Does Crystal Healing Work? (2017)

www.rainbowsofhealing.com

 

How Crystals Work: The Science of Crystal Healing

Judy Hall

https://www.healyourlife.com/how-crystals-work-the-science-of-crystal-healing (2016)

 

Author Information

Laura Jones

Florida Gulf Coast University

 

Author Biography

Laura Jones is a student at Florida Gulf Coast University majoring in Resort and Hospitality Management.

 

Editor Information:

Mary Wisnom

Professor, School of Resort & Hospitality Management, Florida Gulf Coast University, USA